Hank Cramer is a national-touring cowboy singer from ranching country in eastern Washington.  He is best known for his booming bass voice, smooth picking on a flat-top guitar, and a wry sense of humor.  Hank is a historian as well as a musician. His passion is telling the stories of cowboys, miners, and pioneers through the songs they left behind, and a few more that we’ve written about them.  He has recorded twenty-two CDs, several movie soundtracks, and performed an hour-long TV concert for National Public Broadcasting. In 2011 Hank earned the prestigious Humanities Washington Award, presented to one performer each year for excellence in the arts.

Hank has been a fulltime traveling musician for 20 years.  His performances have included the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Elko, Nevada; the Cochise Cowboy Gathering in Arizona; and the Columbia River Cowboy Gathering in his home state.  He ties history and music together at museums that celebrate the story of western migration. Hank performs annually at the National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center in Baker, Oregon; the Sharlot Hall Museum in Prescott, Arizona; the California Trail Interpretive Center in Elko, Nevada; Fort Laramie National Historic Site in Wyoming; and the National Historic Trails Center in Casper, Wyoming.

Before becoming a fulltime musician, Hank served a career as an Army paratrooper and another as a 911 emergency communications manager.  After 9/11, Hank interrupted his music career to return to military service, first as an ROTC instructor at University of Washington, then as an adviser to the Afghan National Army.  He retired from the service in 2004 and resumed his music career.  Hank is married to Kit McLean Cramer, a professional horsewoman and outfitter whose great-grandfather homesteaded their place in Washington’s Methow Valley in 1894.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:  Call 509 996-3528 or e-mail hankc@methownet.com

 

 

www.hankcramer.com

HOWDY!

tickets will be available july 1st.

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